Command Line Options

The following switches can occur on the command line:

-quiet

decrease verbosity of output.

-batch

specifies batch mode, where all input is directed from standard input. An error code of 0 is returned upon encountering the end of input and 1 on error. Any files given as arguments are loaded before standard input is processed.

-core

requires an argument that should be the name of a core file. Rather than using the default core file (\file{lib/lisp.core}), the specified core file is loaded.

-edit

specifies to enter the editor. A file to edit may be specified by placing the name of the file between the program name (usually "nightshade") and the first switch.

-eval

accepts one argument which should be a Lisp form to evaluate during the start up sequence. The value of the form will not be printed unless it is wrapped in a form that does output.

-einit

accepts an argument that should be the name of the editor init file to load the first time the function `ed' is invoked. The default is to load "nightshade-ed.fasl", or failing that "nightshade-ed.lisp", from the user's home directory. If the file is in any other directory, the full path must be specified.

-init

accepts an argument that should be the name of an init file to load during the normal start up sequence. The default is to load "nightshade.fasl" or, failing that, "nightshade.lisp" from the user's home directory. If the file is in any other directory, the full path must be specified.

-noinit

accepts no arguments and specifies that an init file should not be loaded during the normal start up sequence. Also, this switch suppresses the loading of an editor init file when the editor is started up with the -edit switch.

-xoff

specifies that the editor must run in the terminal instead of as an X application

-load

accepts an argument which should be the name of a file to load into Lisp before entering the Lisp read-eval-print loop.

-slave

specifies that Lisp should start up as a slave Lisp and try to connect to an editor Lisp. The name of the editor to connect to must be specified -- to find the editor's name, use the editor "Accept Slave Connections" command. The name for the editor Lisp is of the form:

machine-name:socket

where machine-name is the internet host name for the machine and socket is the decimal number of the socket to connect to.

Editor Command Line Options details the use of the -edit and -slave switches.

Arguments to the above switches can be specified in one of two ways:

switch=value

or

switch value

For example, either of the following two commands start up the saved core file test.core:

lisp -core=test.core
lisp -core test.core